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morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with jim cramer who is tasting mcdonald's new breakfast lineup which we'll talk about this hour. got a triple whammy of dow, dupont, trafrlers, utx pretty good as futures are on the rise. day of reckoning, some have said, netflix soaring after last night's results. in europe, weak pmis out of germany, china, too, but the european markets are pricing in higher expectations this morning for a rate cut from the ecb. our road map begins with users streaming internet flicks, the house of cards paying off for the company and shares skyrocketing for the company. is it too late to buy the stock. >> we're counting down to apple's earnings report and that will be after the close. the shares over the $400 mark. one way or the other. >> luxury not dead, at least not according to coach and we'll dig deeper into those numbers. >> u.s. airways and delta beating those numbers. >> not quite as sanguine. we'll take a look at the airline sector and talk about travel turbulence a bit, as well. >> definitely not comericcal. >> for the fir
afternoon. to help us through the issues of the day today ambassador jim jones, former u.s. ambassador to mexico will be here in studio with us. igor volsky, of course here as he is every tuesday from think progress and a very exciting guest today and an unusual guest, randy couture a former mma boxing star, a boxing star and an mma star and a great actor, too. extenders? >> expendables. i think he's a chump and i'm going to tell him that to his face. >> bill: he will crush you! >> you're probably right. >> bill: he will crush you. >> you're definitely right! >> bill: i have a friend who wrestled with him. >> no kidding! >> bill: he told him didn't stand a chance. flattened him out. >> if you're not familiar with randy, go online and do a google image search for him. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. >> there are a lot of pictures of him with his shirt off. he is chilled out of rock. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. i'm going to have cyprian come in and stand alongside of me. >> your body guard? [ laughter ] perfect. >> bill: all right. and yes indeed, they're whining about air tr
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
agricultural. thank you all very very much for being here. megan smith, jim kolbe and judson please come forward. we are going to go straight through the noon hour because of the numbers we have. some senators have been thinking of going in for lunch and other meetings that are taking place but we will begin with megan smith who is commissioner of the vermont commission of tourism appointed by -- in 2011. before that she was in the vermont legislature and before she became commissioner she and her husband owned and operated the vermont in which is a very nice place. for over a dozen years. ms. smith, go ahead. >> chairman lacie ranking member grassley members of the committee i'm pleased to be here today on behalf of the vermont department of tourism and marketing and the broader traveling community to highlight the importance of travel related provisions included in immigration reform. vermont is very dependent on tourism. our percentage of jobs in the industry is twice the natural -- national average of 38%. the majority of our businesses are small and family-owned and agri-tourism is
activated and incident management assistant jim, three preliminary damage assessment teams, and we are also standing by to assist in any other way. our eoc remains at level three, which is at increased readiness. we will continue to monitor the events over the course of the day and provide you with updates as they are relevant. i might add, mr. chairman, that many of the things i've just gone through are examples of the kinds of activities that have been supported by the committee, through fema, through the various grants that we supply, search and rescue being a good example of the kinds of things that grants have been supporting increasing our capacity for response and resilience as a nation. so that is the most recent on west, texas. with respect to boston, we are, we are investi this as an act of terror. we ae assisting. ice is part of the jttf. we have over four dozen ice agents now assigned to the boston office helping in the investigation. cdp is assisting in a number of tays immediately after the we work to close logan, the ground air for a few hours and to institute special targeti
a jim demint exit at exit security system as well as economic conditions is a good thing. a variety of economic legislation in this are good on balance. >> i want america to win. >> me too. craig huey about how the u.s. is not using immigration policy effectively and as many other countries are to improve economic growth. what countries did you see as doing a good job? numbers, look at the it's in my written testimony, under core visas are for economic reasons at the moment. given the paramount need for economic growth, that cuts across our ability to deal with all our policy challenges, those will all be easier with faster economic growth. focusing on that makes more sense. other countries, we have charts in the written testimony, have a high percentage. other countries that have made reforms recently like the united kingdom looking to do this. if you look at the countries that are struggling right now and likely to fail, dejapan. europe, the exception is germany, which has undertaken a particular percentage of turkish labor. we have to recognize economic reality and adjust our pol
the period of jim crow. that is our live coverage for today and we hope your life again tomorrow. right now we are going to go to the hancock foundation building and this is where the history panel here at "the los angeles times" festival of books is just beginning. you are watching booktv on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] >> will you let me know when we are supposed to start? [laughter] >> good morning. that is my signal. my name is tim newton on back of "the los angeles times" and i'm pleased to welcome you to the 2013 festival of books. books. more specifically i'm delighted to welcome this morning to today's panel which brings some really remarkable authors to talk about their latest work and the idea behind him. before we get going i have been handed a piece of paper that says it's critically important that i read this. please silence all cell phones and i also need to tell you there is a book signing following the session here the book signing for this panel is in the staging area number one. i am told this is on the festival map and the center of the event program so the office h
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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